James Kerwin Photographic
 Architecture & Travel Photography

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Photography doesn’t always go according to plan and of course images aren’t always perfect. This is my honest and open behind the scenes look into what I do as an architecture, adventure and travel photographer.

 

Macassar Beach Pavilion

Our first “real” trip out with the cameras led us into a spot of bother attempting to get a train into Cape Town city Centre, so this was our second attempt to get out with the cameras. After leaving our Airbnb accommodation we drove out of Cape Town.

I came across Macassar Beach Pavilion online some months ago when I first came up with the idea of coming to South Africa as the first destination as a “Nomadic Photographer”. The pavilion is actually an abandoned water park which has since been overtaken by the sand dunes, and is around a 30 minute drive from Cape Town, in the Western Cape of South Africa but resides next to the notorious Khayelitsha Township.

Approaching from the dunes.

Approaching from the dunes.

Inside out, looking out through the entrance.

Inside out, looking out through the entrance.

The Beach Pavilion is part of the Macassar Dunes Reserve and was built around 1991. But now the sand fills every nook and cranny of the once vibrant blue buildings and external swimming pools. You can still however, make out the parking lot and the signage, despite the graffiti and sand. I thought it made for an interesting subject for our first shoot.

Financial troubles hit the Pavilion around the turn of the year 2000, only nine years after opening its doors, when maintenance and staff salary payments began to fall short. And it required a lot of hard work to keep the place clean from sand as the surrounding dunes are known for their unpredictable winds and sand shifts. Neglect from both the employers and the employees began to show and this resulted in a drop in popularity among visitors, with that the water park went out of business and was closed for good after a decline of cash incoming.

The right wing had the greater amount of sand covering the structure.

The right wing had the greater amount of sand covering the structure.

I liked the shapes and the sand, but the lighting (back-light) was a challenge.

I liked the shapes and the sand, but the lighting (back-light) was a challenge.

My "image of the day”, I love the way the sand flows into the scene.

My "image of the day”, I love the way the sand flows into the scene.

A liitle fact about the surrounding area is that within the Macassar conservation reserve you will also find the last remaining forest of endangered White Milkwood Trees. A Southern African coastal tree, with dense foliage, black berries and small greenish flowers (See Image here).

Before we left, I just about had time to throw my new DJi Mavic 2 into the air to capture some video and some stills (shown below), this gave a better over-view of the site.

I shot these images with the following gear: (please be aware that these are affiliate links , by using them, if you purchase equipment or goods it costs you nothing more but I do receive a little kick back which supports me and my work).

My New Camera Rucksack

My Tripod Choice

Geared Tripod Head

My Canon 5DSR

VLOG camera of choice

Make the M50 FULL FRAME

VLOG Microphone

My best friend

Two Lenses used for these images:

Wide Angle

24-70mm Mid Range

Don’t forget I used a drone:

Mavic 2 Drone

Mavic 2 FILTERS

And my NEW gimbal:

Benro Reddog R1

Want £25 off the price of an Airbnb stay?

Use this code to activate the offer: HERE